Diggers Dips Coin Draw
Share
Copy Link
Prize Details
Description
How it Works
Draw Prizes
1st Place
2nd Place
3rd Place
4th Place
5th Place
6th Place
7th Place
8th Place
9th Place
10th Place
5
Tokens
154 of 300 Tickets Available
Prize Details
Description
How it Works
Prize Details
1st
Gold 1855 Half Sovereign
Winner
TBA
2nd
William III Half Crown
Winner
TBA
3rd
Anglo Saxon Sceat - Series E
Winner
TBA
4th
Roman Denarius Of Caracalla
Winner
TBA
5th
Roman Denarius Of Geta
Winner
TBA
6th
Roman Republic Denarius
Winner
TBA
7th
Richard II Half Penny
Winner
TBA
8th
Charles I Shilling
Winner
TBA
9th
Ant of Maximian
Winner
TBA
10th
Charles II Two Pence
Winner
TBA
About This Draw
This draw is for a fine selection of coins to include a gold half sovereign, silver Roman and medieval coins.

1855 Half Sovereign
Half-sovereign coins had a face value of half of a pound. They are legal tender, however, as they are 22-carat gold and contain 3.66g of fine gold, they are worth much more than their face value depending on the current gold spot price.

William III Half Crown
William III was King of England, Ireland and Scotland from 1689 until 1702. He ruled as a joint monarch with his wife, Mary, following the Glorious Revolution and then as King himself following Mary’s death in 1694. His rule saw power transition from the personal rule of the Stuarts to Parliament-centred rule of the Hanover’s. William’s reign saw the minting of Crowns and Guinea’s.

Anglo Saxon Sceat Series E
Its name derives from Old English sceatt, meaning "wealth", "money", and "coin", which has been applied to these coins since the 17th century based on interpretations of the legal codes of Mercia and of Kent under its king Æthelberht. It is likely, however, that the coins were more often known to contemporaries as "pennies" (Old English: peningas), much like their successor silver coins. They are very diverse, organized into over a hundred numbered types derived from the British Museum Catalogue of the 1890s and by broader alphabetical classifications laid out by British numismatist Stuart Rigold in the 1970s. The huge volume of finds made in the last thirty years using metal detectors has radically altered understanding of this coinage and, while it is now clear that these coins were in everyday use across eastern and southern England in the early 8th century.

Roman Denarius of Caracalla
Caracalla, formally known as Antoninus (Marcus Aurelius Antoninus), was Roman emperor from 198 to 217. He was a member of the Severan dynasty, the elder son of Septimius Severus and Julia Domna. Co-ruler with his father from 198, he continued to rule with his brother Geta, emperor from 209, after their father's death in 211. His brother was murdered by the Praetorian Guard later that year, supposedly under orders from Caracalla himself, who then reigned afterwards as sole ruler of the Roman Empire.

Roman Denarius of Geta
When Septimius Severus died in Eboracum in early 211, Caracalla and Geta were proclaimed joint emperors and returned to Rome. It is said that on the journey from Britain to Rome the two brothers kept well away from each other, not once lodging in the same house or sharing a common meal.
Their joint rule was a failure. The Imperial Palace in Rome was divided into two separate sections, and neither allowed the servants of the other into his own. They only met in the presence of their mother, and with a strong military guard, being in constant fear of assassination. The historian Herodian asserted that the brothers decided to split the empire in two halves, when, by the end of 211, the situation had become unbearable. Caracalla tried unsuccessfully to murder Geta during the festival of Saturnalia (17 December). Finally, on the 26th of December, Caracalla had his mother arrange a peace meeting with his brother in his mother's apartments, thus depriving Geta of his bodyguards, and then had him murdered in her arms by centurions.

Roman Republic Denarius
The coinage of the Roman Republic started with a few silver coins apparently devised for trade with the Greek colonies in Southern Italy, and heavy cast bronze pieces for use in Central Italy.
During the Second Punic war a flexible system of coins in bronze, silver and (occasionally) gold was created. This system was dominated by the silver denarius, a denomination which remained in circulation for 450 years. The coins of the republic (especially the denarii) are of particular interest because they were produced by "mint magistrates", junior officials who choose the designs and legends. This resulted in the production of coins advertising the officials' families for political purposes; most of the messages on these coins can still be understood today.

Richard II Half Penny
Richard II was only eleven years old when he succeeded his grandfather in June 1377. He inherited an impoverished treasury, ruinous expenses of mis- managed wars, and minting conditions which made a healthy coinage vir- tually impossible. Merchants continually complained that the realm was being denuded of its gold and silver, making internal trade most difficult, while the low price offered by the mint for the precious metals made it unprofitable for them to bring bullion to be coined. The fact is that the world price of silver had risen in terms of produce, and only a reduction in the weight of the penny would have eased the situation. This, however, was prohibited by law and was not considered during this reign

Charles I Shilling
Charles I was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1625 until his execution in 1649. As the second Stuart monarch, his reign was marred by fierce disagreements with Parliament - eventually leading to the English Civil War. Only a few coins were produced during Charles’ rule: Unite coins and Gold Crowns.

Ant of Maximian
Maximian, also known as Maximian Herculius, was Roman emperor from 286 to 305. He was Caesar from 285 to 286, then Augustus from 286 to 305. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maximian

Charles II Twopence
King Charles II was the son of Charles I and king of England, Scotland, and Ireland - though his premiership was intermittent due to the state of national politics.
Charles II ruled Scotland from 1649 until 1651, when military rule deposed him. With Cromwell's death came turmoil in Britain, and Charles II returned to be crowned King of England, Scotland and Ireland; a position he held until death in 1685.
How it Works
Tickets
Entering a Live Draw is easy! Let us randomly generate your tickets for you or choose your own fate by selecting any of the remaining tickets available.

Live Draw
Make sure to check back and watch the Live Draw take place in real time. Entrants will be notified by email once the last ticket has been sold, and a countdown will appear on this page indicating when the Live Draw will take place. Keep your eyes peeled!

Winners
All winners will receive a winners email, where we will request their preferred delivery address to send out their prize. All prizes are despatched the very next working day by our preferred and trusted suppliers, Leisure Promotions.
Coin Draw Entrants (45)
Your Browser is Outdated
The browser you are using is outdated and we do not support it.

To access our website, please consider updating your browser.

Alternatively, install Google Chrome or FireFox.